Second Opinion: Ageism develops a nasty twist – Family News & Advice | Parenting, Marriage & Kids | The Irish Tim – Tue, Aug 13, 2013

Sadly, ageism seems to be intensifying…

Now, according to the NPAS, older people are stereotyped as being either “sick, disabled, non-contributors to society” or as “healthy, financially secure, and taking advantage of State benefits that they can afford to pay for themselves”.

The term “intergenerational conflict” has become part of public discourse, implying that older and younger people are in conflict about how income is distributed in society.

via Second Opinion: Ageism develops a nasty twist – Family News & Advice | Parenting, Marriage & Kids | The Irish Tim – Tue, Aug 13, 2013.

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A Socioeconomic Critique of Ageing

More on the pressing issue of ageism, the commoditization of life, and false depictions of aging:

The frustrating thing about these kinds of depictions of ageing is that they frame ageing as a choice—a choice we make when we don’t buy the right skin cream or drive the right car. This, in turn, transforms youth into an economic status symbol—a highly valuable and sought-after community, even in markets that are traditionally geared towards older people. This is inevitable, but it’s not necessarily a bad thing. It becomes a bad thing when people operate off of the assumption that those who don’t have access to this commodity (older people) are somehow less valuable than those who do (younger people).

via A Socioeconomic Critique of Ageing.

John Feather, PhD: International Aging: It’s Not What You Think

This is an important and well written article. We hear a great deal of noise about the aging population. We don’t need to worry about the aging population, we need to redefine aging itself…

 

Aging presents formidable challenges, but, as Dr. John Beard says, “we need to reinvent the way we think about ageing itself. We want to be stretching life in the middle, not just at the end. This means keeping people healthy for as long as possible, and giving them the opportunity to do the things they want and that society needs.” It is a call to action we need to hear around the world.

via John Feather, PhD: International Aging: It’s Not What You Think.

Money, Meaning, and the Aging Population

[Exploring Life] A large proportion of our lifetime is focused on earning money as a means to ensure our survival in society. In order to earn an income we participate in some form of work. This participation in the workforce is commonly viewed as “a contribution” to the economic growth of our society. The distribution of money across the population suffers from extreme imbalance; some people live in poverty while others have far more money than they require. Money in and of itself is empty and meaningless; nevertheless, it remains the standardized symbol of material prosperity in a modern-day dramatization of the survival of the fittest…

More… Money, Meaning, and the Aging Population.

My Senior Portal

Perhaps a new trend is emerging – a seniors Internet portal…

Welcome to our web portal, a broad-based and multi-functional place to explore the internet, participate in engaging activities, create and maintain important information with safety and security, find pertinent and important information, find providers of services on a local basis and products which can be ordered with ease. We have designed the portal taking into consideration the needs and desires of the 55+ population, their family, friends and caregivers.

via My Senior Portal.

Making the Choice Between Money and Meaning – Umair Haque – Harvard Business Review

But the fact that it seems nearly impossible to build a stable, secure, happy life in the segment formerly known as the “middle class” by doing worthwhile work that makes a real human difference is the exception that proves the rule, illuminating just how deeply, and perhaps fatally broken our economy is.

You and I face the difficult choice of trading meaning for money; we weigh the searing moments of real human accomplishment against the soul-sucking “work” of earning the next car payment by polishing up another meaningless PowerPoint deck packed with tactics to win games whose net result is the creation of little of real value for much of anyone who’s not a sociopath. This is the deepest kind of theft; not merely prosperity having been looted from societies, but significance having been stolen from human lives.

via Making the Choice Between Money and Meaning – Umair Haque – Harvard Business Review.

Upgrading aging Toronto Hydro infrastructure to cost customers $3 a month – The Globe and Mail

More things deteriorating…

The Ontario Energy Board has approved most of a $750-million spending plan to improve Toronto’s aging hydro equipment.

The two-year development plan, which Toronto Hydro says is needed to prevent blackouts, will increase hydro bills in the city by about $3 a month.

The accepted proposal comes more than a year after Toronto Hydro unsuccessfully proposed a three-year $1.5-billion plan that would have cost customers an additional $5 per month.

via Upgrading aging Toronto Hydro infrastructure to cost customers $3 a month – The Globe and Mail.