Generation gap: Ageism hurts Europe’s youth

Ageism can work in both directions…

“We found young people actually felt they were discriminated against their age more than older people,” Fitzgerald told CNBC Tuesday.

(Read more: Children’s Life Chances in Poverty-Stricken Europe Decrease)

The data collected in 2008/09 shows that the proportion of people aged 70 and above who report experiencing age-based prejudice ranges from 15 percent in Sweden to 57 percent in the Czech Republic, while for people under 25 this figure ranges from 18 percent in Portugal to 77 percent in Finland.

via Generation gap: Ageism hurts Europe’s youth.

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New Article – Conversations with Grief

Grief and Bereavement: A Conversation with Grief

Conversations with Grief

[Exploring Life] As the third anniversary of my mother’s death approaches, the feeling of her absence remains remarkably vibrant. While the nature of my grief continues to transfigure itself, even three years later, it has definitely not “gone away” and nor can I say that, “I am over it.” In The Nature of Grief, I stated that, “The feeling of grief does not go away, but it does evolve.” I also indicated that at a fundamental level, grief and bereavement are necessary spiritual endeavours in life, more than they are psychological events that need to be “fixed.” I would like to explore here the possibility of grief as an intimate conversation, that is, how it can befriend us and teach us to live deeper, more authentic lives.

I could not have imagined writing the previous sentence three years ago while immersed the raw grief that emerges during that mercurial period of time immediately following the loss of a loved one. In the aftermath of death, grief cuts a gaping wound deep within our hearts. During this period of mourning, as we try to find our way through the emotional instability that has fallen upon us, we are unable to imagine the hidden potential within our suffering. None of this is to say that I no longer feel the poignancy, and indeed the heavy weight in my heart, over the loss of my parents. It is to say, however, that the nature of my grief has changed over time, and our capacity to move into conversation with it is an essential core competency in living.

[Read more]

 

Thresholds: Profound Moments in Life

Thresholds: Profound Moments in Life

Thresholds: Profound Moments in Life

[Exploring Life] The rhythm of our life is defined by the thresholds of experience that open up along our pathway through time. Thresholds are points of no return; they form passageways between what once was, and what now will be. We all experience life-changing events that unexpectedly alter our trajectory through time. These profound moments [read more]

Fast Time and the Aging Mind – NYTimes.com

Ageing and the feeling of time – becoming stuck in mindless habits create the illusion that time passes more quickly – mindfulness and engaging in new endeavours expand our feeling of time…

It’s simple: if you want time to slow down, become a student again. Learn something that requires sustained effort; do something novel. Put down the thriller when you’re sitting on the beach and break out a book on evolutionary theory or Spanish for beginners or a how-to book on something you’ve always wanted to do. Take a new route to work; vacation at an unknown spot. And take your sweet time about it.

via Fast Time and the Aging Mind – NYTimes.com.

After a Death, an Extreme Form of Grieving – NYTimes.com

There has been a great deal of talk about categorizing “Complicated Grief” as a mental disorder – even though it is not clearly defined. I wonder if this leads to the possibility of taking a pill for grief – an uncomfortable thought…

In an age when activities like compulsive shopping are viewed as disorders, the subject of grief is especially sensitive. Deeply bereaved people are often reluctant to talk about their sorrow, and when they do, they are insulted by the use of terms like disorder or addiction. Grief, after all, is noble — emblematic of the deep love between parents and children, spouses and even friends. Our sorrows, the poets tell us, make us human; would proper therapy have denied us Tennyson’s “In Memoriam”?

Diagnosing a deeper form of grief, however, is not about taking away anyone’s sorrow. “We don’t get rid of suffering in our treatment,” Dr. Shear said. “We just help people come to terms with it more quickly.”

via After a Death, an Extreme Form of Grieving – NYTimes.com.

Aging – Metallurgical Processes

This is very interesting – a company trying to perfect the aging process in order to optimize metals…

Aging has been extensively studied and many companies are working towards perfecting the ability to accelerate and increase the weathering or aging process to bring the metal surface to a desired texture and color.

via Aging – Metallurgical Processes.